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Don’t blame medium for messenger’s flaws

Don’t blame medium for messenger’s flaws

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Mel Poole's column ["Events love free marketing, but Web fuels too much of a good thing," July 24] makes some good points, but it does contain some flawed logic.

Sure, there are plenty of Internet sites practicing bad journalism. By the same token, there are plenty of radio and television stations and, dare I say it, newspapers and traditional wire services, practicing bad journalism. Sensationalism isn't limited to one means of information transmission.

One way for a press officer to check legitimacy is to see if the person requesting credentials belongs to a professional media organization. If the press officer is not familiar with those groups, perhaps that should be changed.

Sure, it's convenient for a press officer to say "no Internet media," but unfortunately, it's the same as saying "no television stations." Press officers and members of the media are in a symbiotic relationship, and each case should be considered on its own merit.

I've been covering motorsports online and off-line for the past 21 years. I've seen journalists come and go in the sport. I've seen photographers turn into writers and writers turn into editors. Some people are good journalists. Some will never be good journalists — no matter for whom they write.

Michael F. Hollander
Redondo Beach, Calif.

Michael F. Hollander is editor of Racing Information Systems (http://www.motorsportsforum.com).

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